NYSMCH

Initiatives

New York State Maternal and Child Health Collaboratives 

A series of learning collaborative projects to develop and implement promising perinatal interventions to provide the best and safest care for women and infants in New York State. Current projects include a focus on obstetric hemorrhage, opioid use disorder, and birth equity improvement.

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Status: Active

November 2016 to October 2021

  • Who: Birthing hospitals and community-based organizations across New York State.
  • Funder: The project is funded by The New York State Perinatal Quality Collaborative (NYSPQC), which is an initiative led by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) Division of Family Health (DFH). 
  • Our Role: NICHQ works closely with NYSDOH, clinical experts, and quality improvement experts to support a series of learning collaboratives that apply quality improvement methodology to improve perinatal care delivery.  

If you are interested in learning more about this project, visit the NYSPQC page or email: [email protected]

Current Intervention Projects

The current intervention projects of the NYSPQC are: 

New York State Obstetric Hemorrhage Project, which focuses on reducing maternal morbidity and  mortality by improving the assessment, identification and management of obstetric hemorrhage; 

New York State Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy & Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Project, which  focuses on identifying and managing the care of people with opioid use disorder during pregnancy, and  improving the identification, standardization of therapy and coordination of aftercare of infants with  neonatal abstinence syndrome; and 

New York State Birth Equity Improvement Project, which assists birthing facilities in identifying how  individual and systemic racism impacts birth outcomes at their organizations and taking action to  improve both the experience of care and perinatal outcomes for Black birthing people in the  communities they serve 

 

Webinar

Recorded Webinars 

Managing Pregnant Patients During COVID-19